Speed Training

18 Sports Performance Training Myths

1. Gaining muscle will make you tight and slow
2. You should keep your weight on your heels when squatting and deadlifting
3. More is always better
4. In-season training should be light with high reps
5. Deadlifts are bad for your back
6. Squats are bad for your knees
7. Athletes should do a lot of direct core work
8. Athletes shouldn’t workout on the days prior to a game
9. Training to muscular failure is necessary to gain strength and muscle mass
10. If it was on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Reddit, etc. it must be good
11. Jumping is the best way to increase your vertical jump
12. Practicing running technique is the best way to improve speed
13. Workouts should be switched frequently to keep the body guessing
14. Lifting weights stunts growth
15. All athletes should squat to the same depth
16. Athletes should static stretch before training, practices, and games
17. Running sprints at the end of practice or a training session improves speed
18. Karaoke is a warm up exercise (karaoke is what you do on a Friday night, CARIOCA is a warm up exercise)

3 Explosive Exercises to Increase Acceleration

3 Explosive Exercises to Increase Acceleration

In the world of sports, they say speed kills. The truth is, acceleration is what really separates elite athletes from the rest of us. In most sports, top speed is rarely reached during competition. So, while speed is definitely important, what matters most for athletes is their ability to explosively accelerate for short distances. Here are three exercises to help you gain a step on your competition.

The Importance of Ankle Training for Athletes

The Importance of Ankle Training for Athletes

If you have ever spent a winter driving in Minnesota, you can appreciate the need for traction. When you’re on ice, you can have all the horsepower in the world, but if your tires don’t have traction with the road, you’re going nowhere. The human body is no different. You can have a ton of strength in your hips, but without a strong and stable ankle, much of that power will never reach the ground. And, like a Honda Civic in 12 inches of snow, you’ll be going nowhere quick.

In-Season Strength and Conditioning Training

In-Season Strength and Conditioning Training

Everyone knows the importance of strength and speed training in the off-season, but when the season finally rolls around, many athletes stop training completely. This is a mistake. Not only do these athletes stop progressing, they actually regress and go backwards with their strength and speed. Within only a few short weeks, noticeable strength and speed drops will occur (1). As the season goes on, performance markers continue on their downward spiral, resulting in an athlete that is weakest and slowest at the most crucial time of the season – playoffs.

All is not lost, though. By simply implementing a well thought-out in-season training program, athletes can maintain and potentially even improve their strength and speed, without sacrificing any practice time.

How to Improve Limb Separation

How to Improve Limb Separation

When we look for indicators of athleticism, we generally turn to tests such as a vertical jump or 40-yard dash time. These are definitely good standards to compare athletes against each other with, but another good indicator of overall athleticism is an athlete’s ability to move their limbs independently of one another, without excessive trunk movement. These are what many people call “smooth” or sneaky fast” runners – the athletes that pull away from their defenders even though they look effortless in their movement.